Switching from textbook based teaching to TCI

Here is a helpful infographic that will give you some information and steps to follow during the transition. The transition process could be overwhelming so try to practice one skill at a time. Start with the basics, like the art of circling and then add more advanced activities to your repertoire.My personal advice is to start with TCI/TPRS curriculum already published and slowly find out how to make it your own. I see a lot of people going through hell by trying to learn a new methodology and creating all new materials at the same time. They get so exhausted that they eventually end up going back to their comfort zone. Also, although it is not mentioned in the infographic, when I was going through the transition process,  I read lots of books about this method ( I recommend TPRS in a  Year by Ben Slavic, and Fluency Through TPR Storytelling by Blaine Ray ). So every time I was having second thoughts, I would remember the theory and research behind this approach.

the-switch-infographic (3)

 

 

 

The Power of Storytelling

I don’t tell stories in my class but rather, I story ASK.That means that I co-create engaging and fun stories with input from my students by asking a series of patterned questions. Story-asking is a powerful tool that elicits second language acquisition. Even the business sector has recolonized the power of storytelling as a mean to transmit content that is engaging. Writer Rodger Dean Duncan of Forbes magazine wrote an article about the power of storytelling in the business sector. In his article Mr. Duncan states that:

“No doubt about it, the best speakers are good storytellers. The best writers are good storytellers. The best leaders are good storytellers. The best teachers and trainers and coaches are good storytellers. It might even be argued that the best parents are good storytellers.”

Since you probably don’t have time to read the whole article because you have to grade papers, or answer parents’ email or finish your lessons for tomorrow, here’s a cool info-graphic that sums it all up for you!the-science-of-story-telling

TV SERIES IN WORLD LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS

In my French 1 classes we have been watching Téléfrançais videos to hear others French speakers, to practice listening comprehension, to learn new vocabulary, and to practice speaking French . We watched episodes 1-15 and episode 2o (We skipped episode 16-19 because after Sophie left the show my students were devastated.)The show is very silly and yes it was created for younger children but still my students absolutely LOVE IT! Each episode last nine to ten minutes but teaching each episode can take up to 35 to 40 minutes of class.
Before we watch each episode students read a summary of the episode and or we review what happened in the previous episode. While watching the episode  and pretty much after each scene, I pause it and and we talk about it. Then I check for comprehension and asses vocabulary we’ve learned. In Each episode you can find a topic to generate meaningful discussion with your students. For instance, in episode 20 we talked about our dreams and our favorite video games.
Here is a sample lesson. Please let me know how to improve it. Ideas are always welcome!

Telefrançais 15